The New Castle for a New Generation 

By Johnny Malibu Inc. Real Estate Blog!  March 23, 2017

It was just before 5AM on a windy Sunday morning when the Malibu fire station received the first call. October, 21st 2007 marks one of the most destructive days in Malibu’s history. The fire began when the ritual Santa Ana winds got the best of three power poles lining a parched Malibu Canyon. Investigators with the California Public Utilities Commission concluded that at least one of those poles was illegally overloaded which quickly ignited the straw colored brush lying below. The resulting calamity would claim nearly 4,000 acres, 36 vehicles, and 14 structures. Of the 14 structures destroyed, one would standout amongst the rest.  
 Before The Canyon Fire of 2007 there stood a residence uniquely defined from all other Malibu structures. 23800 Malibu Crest was Perched high above the Malibu Country Mart and toted a personality which begged your attention. The Malibu Castle, as it was colloquially known, was an unofficial Malibu monument. Originally built by Dr. Thomas Hodges in 1978, the Malibu castle would quickly became a celebrity in its own right. Growing up in Malibu it was common to hear conflicting rumors, stories, and history of the landmark. Some of the past rumored owners included Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, Bob Dylan, and Tony Robins.
 The most well-known former owner of the castle is Lilly Lawrence. A self-proclaimed Princess, Lilly was born in the oil-rich city of Abadan, Iran. Her Father, Dr. Reza Fallah served as Iran’s oil minister for many years. “Princess” Lilly purchased the castle in 1998 for approximately $3M. It was listed as a 6 bedroom, 8 bath, 10,500 SQFT home with ocean views, 2 apartments, and 5 car garage on 3.5 acres of land. It’s noted that after the purchase Lilly Lawrence performed extensive renovations to the property and even created a website for her new castle. The old website is still up and running and is a nice reminder of how far web design has come since the late 90s. Less than 10 years later the Canyon Fire proved too much for the castle and the fortified facade came tumbling down. Seeing the castle engulfed in flames was a surreal moment for Malibuites. The castle wasn’t just another house it was a legend permanently woven into the fabric of Malibu’s culture and history.
 According to Malibu public records, Lilly was considering rebuilding her fortress in 2011 but eventually opted to list the property as a land sale instead. The property was publicly listed on October 13th of 2014 for $14,880,000. After being on the market for 113 days the price was reduced over $4M to $10,250,000. The property soon sold to renowned designer and developer Scott Gillen, owner of UNVARNISHED for $9,700,000. The iconic property couldn’t have fallen into better hands as Gillen is currently in the throws of one of the most anticipated new build projects in Malibu’s history, aptly named, “The New Castle.”
 Gillen’s company UNVARNISHED has quickly become one of Malibu’s most successful design/build developers, creating such projects as “The Who”, a private Gillen designed community. In a way Gillen’s unique architectural style can be viewed as a microcosm of Malibu culture itself. Open spaces, great views, and subtle luxury. Sound familiar?
The New Castle consists of two independent yet cohesive structures; an 11,000 sqft main residence and 4,200 sqft guest house combining for approximately 15,000 sqft of unrivaled interior living space. The property sits atop 2.5+ acres of prime bluff land overlooking the Santa Monica mountains, Malibu lagoon, Surfrider beach, Catalina Island and the full expanse of the Santa Monica Bay. was fortunate enough to meet with Gillen and listing agent, Sandro Dazzan to preview the nearly finished project. As I drove down the private driveway I was met by an attentive security guard with a long list of pre-approved names and vendors permitted to enter the premises. 30 seconds-in and it already felt like a castle. The 400ft private driveway and expansive motor court was lined with dozens of well-used trucks and industrial equipment, all of which was dwarfed by the towering exterior of the resurrected castle. As I approached the grand entrance I was quickly met by Gillen and Sandro who spared no time explaining the intricate details of the motor court. Capacity for 30+ vehicles, heated valet station and elegant concrete paving design. I could already hear the echoes of future party goers exiting their vehicles.  
 As we entered the main house three things immediately stood out; open spaces, beautiful building materials, and a view of Malibu I never knew existed. Gillen prides himself on his ability to create large, open interior spaces while maintaining an intimate environment and The New Castle is no exception. The main level great room is a staggering 121ft of expansive living space unadulterated by a single post, column, or pillar; not to mention the hand-scraped wood floors, 12’ ceilings lined with rich wooden beams and walls of glass beckoning the natural beauty of Malibu inside the castle’s walls. It felt monumental in size yet inviting, warm, and suitable for both an intimate evening with a partner or the blowout party of the year. The great room opens up to the 75’ ocean view infinity pool, begging the question, is that the moat?
On the west wing of the great room stood a custom built Bulthaup kitchen that perfectly compliments the clean, open, and unobtrusive interior. On the opposite end is the office which could be left open or sectioned off by 8.5 foot glass sliding doors framed in solid teak. Additional features of the great room include a walk-in wine tasting room and cigar lounge both encased in a rubik’s cube of solid teak and glass. Right away the unwavering craftsmanship, the attention to detail and the artisanal approach to every square inch of this residence is evident both visually and in the way in which Gillen spoke of his work. Like a Father boasting about their child’s accomplishments, pride was laden in every word he spoke of The New Castle.
The artful, teak-wrapped steel staircase has yet to be installed so we took an aerial lift in its place. Gillen, operating the lift himself, took us to the upper level where we explored the bedrooms. Each bedroom could be the master suite in any other house but this isn't ‘any other house’, this is a castle. The thoughtful and expertly designed bedroom arrangement orients every bedroom towards a breathtaking view. You get a view and you get a view, everyone gets a view! (my first and last Oprah joke). Some of the bedroom amenities include custom built-in Unvarnished closets, desks and cabinetry, 6’ solid teak pivot doors, programable one-touch lights, blinds and climate control, built-in study stations, and an endless supply of ocean view balconies.
Then there's the master bedroom. An elaborate take on the previous four, sitting high atop the castle, as it should. Simple, open, beautiful and baring the view of all views. Resting high above the heart of Malibu, and looking down upon the luxurious estates of Serra Retreat below, this room is built to awaken the royal blood within. The oversized master bath is fit with an overhead waterfall shower, custom made 5’ circular soaking tub made entirely of solid black walnut, a teak deck overlooking the water and a locker-room sized walk-in closet comprised of Bulthaup cabinetry.
 As we hopped back on the aerial lift and began our descent It dawned on me we still hadn’t seen the bottom level nor the 4,200sqft 2+3 guest house. I pushed my next appointment.
The entire bottom level is a Gillen style salute to entertainment. Although the room is still empty it will soon house a top-of-the-line home theatre, game area, custom teak ping pong table and one touch blackout curtains to hide that Malibu ocean view you’ve been over exposed to all day. The room opens up to yet another large teak deck overlooking the Malibu kingdom. While outside on the deck Gillen pointed upwards towards the pool/moat a story above us. “It’s a waterfall” he said. I didn’t respond, I looked and stared and realized that the pool was designed to cascade an entire level down into a large hidden reservoir below. The pool doesn't just have a waterfall, it IS a waterfall. “WOW, the pool’s a waterfall” I proclaimed, charming and clever as ever.
 We walked around the property and headed towards the guest house. Peering down I saw Larry Ellison’s estate below and thought to myself “that’s an adequate neighbor for a Castle.” As we walked up to the guest house I realized it isn't a guest house at all. Gillen can call it what he wants but at 4,200SQFT this is a proper house house. For reference, according to PropertyShark the average house size in Malibu is just under 3,000sqft. But again, this is not your average house, it’s not even your average castle for that matter. The ground level is a fully loaded gym and spa, packing a full array of fitness equipment, a sauna and a cold-plunge to boot. We walked up a set of teak-wrapped steel stairs and there it was, a matching great room and Bulthaup kitchen sized down a notch. Two more ocean view bedrooms, a few more bathrooms all held to the Gillen golden standard and that was it, “The New Castle.”
In the natural world a forrest fire serves a very important purpose. On the surface, a fire’s initial destructive nature seems life-taking but it’s part of a natural lifecycle that is in fact “life-giving.” A fire clears new space and provides the essential building blocks for a new generation of plant-life to flourish. As destructive and unfortunate as the 2007 Malibu fire was it brought forth the opportunity for new architectural “life.” The next generation’s castle has finally risen from the rubble, it may no longer have turrets, crosses, and stone bridges but I assure you The New Castle is as monumental and regal as ever. Gillen’s ambitious project is set to be complete in the Summer of 2017 with a price tag set at $80M. A price in which you too can be woven into Malibu’s “royal” history. 

The New Castle for a New Generation

It was just before 5AM on a windy Sunday morning when the Malibu fire station received the first call. October, 21st 2007 marks one of the most destructive days in Malibu’s history. The fire began when the ritual Santa Ana winds got the best of three power poles lining a parched Malibu Canyon. Investigators with the California Public Utilities Commission concluded that at least one of those poles was illegally overloaded which quickly ignited the straw colored brush lying below. The resulting calamity would claim nearly 4,000 acres, 36 vehicles, and 14 structures. Of the 14 structures destroyed, one would standout amongst the rest.  

 Before The Canyon Fire of 2007 there stood a residence uniquely defined from all other Malibu structures. 23800 Malibu Crest was Perched high above the Malibu Country Mart and toted a personality which begged your attention. The Malibu Castle, as it was colloquially known, was an unofficial Malibu monument. Originally built by Dr. Thomas Hodges in 1978, the Malibu castle would quickly became a celebrity in its own right. Growing up in Malibu it was common to hear conflicting rumors, stories, and history of the landmark. Some of the past rumored owners included Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, Bob Dylan, and Tony Robins.

 The most well-known former owner of the castle is Lilly Lawrence. A self-proclaimed Princess, Lilly was born in the oil-rich city of Abadan, Iran. Her Father, Dr. Reza Fallah served as Iran’s oil minister for many years. “Princess” Lilly purchased the castle in 1998 for approximately $3M. It was listed as a 6 bedroom, 8 bath, 10,500 SQFT home with ocean views, 2 apartments, and 5 car garage on 3.5 acres of land. It’s noted that after the purchase Lilly Lawrence performed extensive renovations to the property and even created a website for her new castle. The old website is still up and running and is a nice reminder of how far web design has come since the late 90s. Less than 10 years later the Canyon Fire proved too much for the castle and the fortified facade came tumbling down. Seeing the castle engulfed in flames was a surreal moment for Malibuites. The castle wasn’t just another house it was a legend permanently woven into the fabric of Malibu’s culture and history. 

 According to Malibu public records, Lilly was considering rebuilding her fortress in 2011 but eventually opted to list the property as a land sale instead. The property was publicly listed on October 13th of 2014 for $14,880,000. After being on the market for 113 days the price was reduced over $4M to $10,250,000. The property soon sold to renowned designer and developer Scott Gillen, owner of UNVARNISHED for $9,700,000. The iconic property couldn’t have fallen into better hands as Gillen is currently in the throws of one of the most anticipated new build projects in Malibu’s history, aptly named, “The New Castle.” 

 Gillen’s company UNVARNISHED has quickly become one of Malibu’s most successful design/build developers, creating such projects as “The Who”, a private Gillen designed community. In a way Gillen’s unique architectural style can be viewed as a microcosm of Malibu culture itself. Open spaces, great views, and subtle luxury. Sound familiar?

The New Castle consists of two independent yet cohesive structures; an 11,000 sqft main residence and 4,200 sqft guest house combining for approximately 15,000 sqft of unrivaled interior living space. The property sits atop 2.5+ acres of prime bluff land overlooking the Santa Monica mountains, Malibu lagoon, Surfrider beach, Catalina Island and the full expanse of the Santa Monica Bay. was fortunate enough to meet with Gillen and listing agent, Sandro Dazzan to preview the nearly finished project. As I drove down the private driveway I was met by an attentive security guard with a long list of pre-approved names and vendors permitted to enter the premises. 30 seconds-in and it already felt like a castle. The 400ft private driveway and expansive motor court was lined with dozens of well-used trucks and industrial equipment, all of which was dwarfed by the towering exterior of the resurrected castle. As I approached the grand entrance I was quickly met by Gillen and Sandro who spared no time explaining the intricate details of the motor court. Capacity for 30+ vehicles, heated valet station and elegant concrete paving design. I could already hear the echoes of future party goers exiting their vehicles.  

 As we entered the main house three things immediately stood out; open spaces, beautiful building materials, and a view of Malibu I never knew existed. Gillen prides himself on his ability to create large, open interior spaces while maintaining an intimate environment and The New Castle is no exception. The main level great room is a staggering 121ft of expansive living space unadulterated by a single post, column, or pillar; not to mention the hand-scraped wood floors, 12’ ceilings lined with rich wooden beams and walls of glass beckoning the natural beauty of Malibu inside the castle’s walls. It felt monumental in size yet inviting, warm, and suitable for both an intimate evening with a partner or the blowout party of the year. The great room opens up to the 75’ ocean view infinity pool, begging the question, is that the moat?

On the west wing of the great room stood a custom built Bulthaup kitchen that perfectly compliments the clean, open, and unobtrusive interior. On the opposite end is the office which could be left open or sectioned off by 8.5 foot glass sliding doors framed in solid teak. Additional features of the great room include a walk-in wine tasting room and cigar lounge both encased in a rubik’s cube of solid teak and glass. Right away the unwavering craftsmanship, the attention to detail and the artisanal approach to every square inch of this residence is evident both visually and in the way in which Gillen spoke of his work. Like a Father boasting about their child’s accomplishments, pride was laden in every word he spoke of The New Castle.

The artful, teak-wrapped steel staircase has yet to be installed so we took an aerial lift in its place. Gillen, operating the lift himself, took us to the upper level where we explored the bedrooms. Each bedroom could be the master suite in any other house but this isn't ‘any other house’, this is a castle. The thoughtful and expertly designed bedroom arrangement orients every bedroom towards a breathtaking view. You get a view and you get a view, everyone gets a view! (my first and last Oprah joke). Some of the bedroom amenities include custom built-in Unvarnished closets, desks and cabinetry, 6’ solid teak pivot doors, programable one-touch lights, blinds and climate control, built-in study stations, and an endless supply of ocean view balconies. 

Then there's the master bedroom. An elaborate take on the previous four, sitting high atop the castle, as it should. Simple, open, beautiful and baring the view of all views. Resting high above the heart of Malibu, and looking down upon the luxurious estates of Serra Retreat below, this room is built to awaken the royal blood within. The oversized master bath is fit with an overhead waterfall shower, custom made 5’ circular soaking tub made entirely of solid black walnut, a teak deck overlooking the water and a locker-room sized walk-in closet comprised of Bulthaup cabinetry.

 As we hopped back on the aerial lift and began our descent It dawned on me we still hadn’t seen the bottom level nor the 4,200sqft 2+3 guest house. I pushed my next appointment. 

The entire bottom level is a Gillen style salute to entertainment. Although the room is still empty it will soon house a top-of-the-line home theatre, game area, custom teak ping pong table and one touch blackout curtains to hide that Malibu ocean view you’ve been over exposed to all day. The room opens up to yet another large teak deck overlooking the Malibu kingdom. While outside on the deck Gillen pointed upwards towards the pool/moat a story above us. “It’s a waterfall” he said. I didn’t respond, I looked and stared and realized that the pool was designed to cascade an entire level down into a large hidden reservoir below. The pool doesn't just have a waterfall, it IS a waterfall. “WOW, the pool’s a waterfall” I proclaimed, charming and clever as ever. 

 We walked around the property and headed towards the guest house. Peering down I saw Larry Ellison’s estate below and thought to myself “that’s an adequate neighbor for a Castle.” As we walked up to the guest house I realized it isn't a guest house at all. Gillen can call it what he wants but at 4,200SQFT this is a proper house house. For reference, according to PropertyShark the average house size in Malibu is just under 3,000sqft. But again, this is not your average house, it’s not even your average castle for that matter. The ground level is a fully loaded gym and spa, packing a full array of fitness equipment, a sauna and a cold-plunge to boot. We walked up a set of teak-wrapped steel stairs and there it was, a matching great room and Bulthaup kitchen sized down a notch. Two more ocean view bedrooms, a few more bathrooms all held to the Gillen golden standard and that was it, “The New Castle.”

In the natural world a forrest fire serves a very important purpose. On the surface, a fire’s initial destructive nature seems life-taking but it’s part of a natural lifecycle that is in fact “life-giving.” A fire clears new space and provides the essential building blocks for a new generation of plant-life to flourish. As destructive and unfortunate as the 2007 Malibu fire was it brought forth the opportunity for new architectural “life.” The next generation’s castle has finally risen from the rubble, it may no longer have turrets, crosses, and stone bridges but I assure you The New Castle is as monumental and regal as ever. Gillen’s ambitious project is set to be complete in the Summer of 2017 with a price tag set at $80M. A price in which you too can be woven into Malibu’s “royal” history. 

Congratulations to Irene Dazzan-Palmer for making the Dynamic Women 2016 list.ANGELO December 2016.pdf

A Malibu House With an Airplane ‘Chandelier’ Lists for $60 Million

Under construction, the spec home will come with a section of a vintage warplane in its 120-foot-long living room

The Wall Street Journal 

$11 million — Malibu

A newly built contemporary-style home in the 24000 block of Malibu Road sold after coming on the market in February for $13.5 million. More recently, it had been listed at $11.995 million, records show.

The newly built oceanfront home in the 24000 block of Malibu Road features retractable walls of glass, an elevator and a glass-and-steel floating staircase.

Entered through a courtyard with a fountain, the 3,188-square-foot home has retractable walls of glass, an elevator and a glass- and steel-enclosed staircase. Three floors of living take in unobstructed ocean views.

Public areas done in wide-plank oak floors include an open-plan living room with a wall fireplace, a formal dining room and a kitchen with a large center island. There are four bedrooms and five bathrooms in all.

Exterior features include a wide patio with a raised spa and a rooftop deck with an outdoor fireplace and living room. Private access to the beach below completes the coastal setting.

Sandro Dazzan and Irene Dazzan-Palmer of Coldwell Banker, represented the buyer.

http://www.hauteresidence.com/haute-residence-l-a-luxury-real-estate-summit-recap-power-players-under-40-panel-discussion/

The event was moderated by Timothy Lappen, Esq., founder and chairman of Luxury Home Group, a real estate legal group, and hosted by Seth Semilof, publisher of luxury publications Haute Living, Haute Residence, and Haute Time.

The first panel discussion with the “Power Players Under 40,” featuring Million Dollar Listing stars David Parnes, James Harris, Josh Altman, Matt Altman, and Madison Hildebrand, as well as Aaron Kirman, and Sandro Dazzan, focused the conversation on how appearing as a real estate professional on a reality TV show has affected their public image as well as their business and how to balance home and business life.

Timothy Lappen: Most of you on the panel have some involvement with reality television real estate. So, tell us. Has that been good or bad for you? Are you happy you did it? Are there drawbacks for the guys who aren’t in that? Do you wish you were? Are you happy you’re not? Do you want to talk at all about your experiences with television?

“I’ll tell you now that the power of television is mind-boggling…”–James Harris

James Harris: “I’ll tell you now that the power of television is mind-boggling…I had no idea getting into TV what it was going to bring. I remember when David and I got the call, I thought it was a big joke. I thought someone was winding us up…Now, our phone rings all the time. I think that your reputation is everything, especially in this business. And it’s so hard to earn a reputation, but it’s so easy to ruin your reputation. So, I think for us, with the power of TV and then meeting these clients in real life, it’s so important to be real to who you are and to carry that message to who your clients might be. But you know what, it’s been great for David and I. It’s done wonders for our business, and I’m very grateful for it.”

Josh Altman: “You can’t half it, which I thought I could do. I thought, Oh, I’m just going to do the real estate part; I’m not going to do the personal part…You can only get me selling the good stuff. You can’t do that, and you figure that out really quick that people don’t want to just see you sell houses and make money. They actually want to see drama…But at the end of the day, it’s not do I like that guy or not, it’s do I want that guy do represent me and my money?”

“I feel that a reputation is probably the most important thing that we have as real estate agents…”–Sandro Dazzan

Sandro Dazzan: “They approach me all the time to be on the show, and I always struggle with it. People say, Oh, there’s no such thing as bad press. Get the exposure. And I’m just always a little hesitant. I feel that a reputation is probably the most important thing that we have as real estate agents, and I just get a little nervous giving myself to a producer…I’m still thinking about it, but right now, I don’t think so.”

“…real estate is still who you know, who you have access to, and it’s a relationship-based business. Period.”–Aaron Kirman

Aaron Kirman: “There are a million different ways to get to the same destination. For these guys [referring to the stars of Million Dollar Listing], they happen to be great on TV, and that’s part of their persona, part of their life, part of their lifestyle, and they do a great job. For many other people, who are tremendously successful in our industry, they don’t want to do TV or the opportunity hasn’t presented itself, and they’re on top of the game.”

“It’s turned real estate agents in the world of luxury real estate into rock stars.”–Josh Altman

Josh Altman: “Let’s talk about what it’s done to our business in general and our industry in general; whereas, in the beginning people frowned upon it or as you said, in the U.K., sometimes they look down upon real estate agents…It’s turned real estate agents in the world of luxury real estate into rock stars. I get dozens of emails every week from people around the world–because the show plays in 70 different countries–of You inspired me to get into real estate. You inspired me to get off my ass, get out of bed, and start making money even if it’s not in real estate, and I just wanted to thank you…It’s got to a point where we feel like we represent all real estate agents on a global level and it’s a lot of pressure on all of us.”

Lappen: So now you’re created these machines that you call your business, and it’s 27/7 on a slow day…it’s 25/9 on a big day. How do you live a life? How do you balance a life? How do you have your own life separate from this business?

Harris: “I’m just starting to learn now that between running what I think is a very successful business, filming a TV show; between having a South American wife and two daughters, I will gladly tell this room that it is virtually impossible. And you see this incredible show and what it becomes and there’s this drama and you see my wife and she’s telling me off and David and I are having an argument, and it’s allhahaha. Let me tell you, this is hard, bloody work…If I don’t actually learn to let go, and go home in the evening, and put my cell phone down for an hour, and put my daughters to bed, and read them a book, and give them a bath, it’s game over because if I lose them, I lose this. It’s clock work.”

“Whether you’ve got a team or an assistant or not, you do have to learn how to delegate, and that is an actual learned task.”–Madison Hildebrand

Madison Hildebrand: “Whether you’ve got a team or an assistant or not, you do have to learn how to delegate, and that is an actual learned task. It’s not something you necessarily are born with because most of us in real estate are Type A, and we like to control most of the situation…Let me just tell you how it really works. You’re your own secretary; you’re your own marketing advisor; you’re your own publicist; you’re your own negotiator; you’re your own every single part of the business until you can afford to have some help.”

“Delegation and trust is huge.”–Dave Parnes (center)

David Parnes: “Delegation and trust is huge. James and I were having a meeting with our team yesterday, which isn’t that big right now. We have a team of five in total, right now–soon to be six and will be hiring someone else for seven. Our biggest problem is that we did set up a company, and we did everything from the beginning. We didn’t have an assistant or anything. And I think gradually as you progress and know that you need to grow as a company, it’s imperative to delegate…If we build up a team around us, which we’re doing right now and be able to delegate and properly instruct ourselves as a proper company, we’re going to do tenfold the business because you’re giving the right tasks to the right people. You play to your strengths–speaking in front of people, negotiating deals–and you go away from your weaknesses…”

Lappen: How do you treat something that’s more difficult to find a buyer for because it’s more unusual? Or if you’re looking for people in other countries–I presume you rely on HauteResidence.com to list it–but do you use a drone, for example, or do you have very high-end, splashy ads?

Dazzan: Basics, I think. Professional, high-resolution still images are so powerful on the Internet. Of course, you’re seeing the drones and the video footage and these one, two, three minute videos with high production…cut to music, which are fantastic, I think, for international buyers. But a lot of buyers that are online, they just want to click through the photos really quick. They don’t want to sit and watch a two, three minute video. So again, back to basics. Just great, beautiful, still images are really powerful. But again, at the same time, for these luxury properties that are so huge that you can’t capture with a still image, I think with the video tours and the drones, and then cutting to songs and adding actresses and actors, you forget you’re watching a real estate video. You think you’re watching a movie, and I think that’s part of creating the experience that the property offers because you’re selling a lifestyle. So, if you can create that in the video, that’s powerful, and you can get the buyers to pick up the phone and call you.”

Lappen: How do you reach people in France and England? How do you reach these people so that they know who you are? Obviously with the TV show being shown in, what’d you say, 70 countries? That must be helpful. But otherwise, how do you market to people?

Kirman: “I think at the end of the day it’s really important to be in as many venues as you possibly can, nationally and internationally. That said, real estate is still who you know, who you have access to, and it’s a relationship-based business. Period.”

Josh Altman: “I think partnerships are super important as well. A big decision of Matt and I joining Douglas Elliman was because of there partnership with Knight Frank, and having that audience once you hit Europe because I think a lot of these people now are looking for a return of their investment, not a return in their investment. These are, like he said, lock boxes for these people.”

“If you’re a starting agent, the first thing you should do once you get your commission is pay your rent and get a website. Your website means everything.”–Matt Altman (right)

Matt Altman: “I think the most important thing it also comes down to is your website. If you’re a starting agent, the first thing you should do once you get your commission is pay your rent and get a website. Your website means everything. They’re so cheap right now, and you can make them look so good. And then, figure out how to get some properties on them.”

10 Modern Mansions

April 14, 2015

For sale: $8.695 million

Just up the Pacific Coast Highway from Los Angeles is the outdoor playground of Malibu, where surfers strut and celebrities relax — or, in the case of this home, where they shoot films, television shows and music videos. The 7,000-square-foot showplace has been a set for “Face/Off,” “Gone in 60 Seconds,” “Beverly Hills 90210,” Britney Spears’ “Work …” video and Chris Brown’s “Fortune” album photos. The listing agent is Sandro Dazzan of Coldwell Banker.

http://www.zillow.com/blog/10-modern-mansions-173493/

 6/16/14 

Coasting: Upfront with Irene Dazzan-Palmer and Sandro Dazzan


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Coasting: Upfront with Irene Dazzan-Palmer and Sandro Dazzan

There is a precious 21-mile stretch of shoreline just north of Los Angeles that has long captivated artists, writers, celebrities and billionaires—from Joan Didion to Cher and Larry Ellison. Locals call it “the ‘Bu,” but most people know it as Malibu, made internationally famous for its sunny weather, rugged cliffs, private beaches and multi-million-dollar real estate. It’s where L.A.’s talent go to build their dream homes in relative anonymity. Where Jackie Collins writes her novels and Bob Dylan records his music. Where Mel Gibson and Pamela Anderson can slip into the neighborhood yogurt shop (“Malibu Yo’”) unbothered. Where generations of sun-kissed families pass down the traditions of surfing and success. Those who settle here usually stay for good. A home for life in flip-flopped paradise.

The latter is true for mother-and-son real estate team Irene Dazzan-Palmer and Sandro Dazzan. Since 2000, they have made their real estate business a family affair as the No. 1 producing agents in the Malibu Colony office of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. Dazzan-Palmer, hailed as “the queen of coastal real estate,” and Dazzan, named on the Forbes “30 Under 30” list in 2012, certainly have their pulse on the coastal way of life. Dazzan-Palmer has lived in Malibu since 1980, raising her son from birth along its sandy shores. Previews® Inside Out recently caught up with mom and son to find out if life really is, well, a beach.

Irene Dazzan-Palmer

Luxury is: Living in Malibu, skiing in Aspen, and traveling in Italy, especially Capri and Positano to St. Barts, my favorite islands.

My idea of perfect happiness is: A healthy and happy family, which I have now. 

I love Malibu because: My favorite people live here, the nature, beaches, canyons…SoCal life is beyond!

Dream home: My house overlooking Surfrider Beach.

Favorite Malibu activity: Power-walking on the beach and hiking in Solstice Canyon. Dining with friends in “the Bu” at world-class restaurants like Nobu and Nikita. I also love to help out my husband, Jim Palmer, in my spare time. He owns and runs Malibu Vineyards right here in Malibu.

Currently Reading: Biography on Frank Sinatra.

Last film watched: The original “Godfather,” have seen it at least 20 times! 

If I wasn’t a real estate agent, I’d be: Producer or director of movies.

Best piece of advice for buying a beach house: To just buy it! You will never regret it!

Sandro Dazzan

Person I most admire: My mother. She has taught me so much, not only as a mother but also as my business partner.

Greatest extravagance: Helicopter skiing in British Columbia.

Greatest necessity: My iPhone.

If I could buy any three coastal homes in the world, they would be in: Malibu, of course! Cabo San Lucas and St. Barts.

Favorite beach: In Malibu, it would be Escondido Beach for the abundance of wildlife and views of Paradise Cove. Away from home, it would be Cala Mitjaneta beach on the island of Menorca, Spain.

Best part about living on the coast: Having so many amazing outdoor activities at my fingertips every day, like hiking in the mountains, surfing, paddle boarding, fishing or simply going for a sunset walk on the beach.  

If I wasn’t a real estate agent, I’d be: Involved with wildlife and wilderness preservation somewhere in a rural beach community or in the mountains.

Preview the Malibu lifestyle: Modern beach house with 60 feet of frontage on the elite Carbon Beach, with interiors designed by Trip Haenisch for $14,500,000 USD.

Irene Dazzan-Palmer and Sandro Dazzan have sold more than $1 billion in luxury coastal real estate. More information on Irene Dazzan-Palmer can be found here. Information on Sandro Dazzan is available here

HOT PROPERTY

Glen Campbell puts Malibu home up for sale

September 06, 2013|By Lauren Beale

Glen Campbell performed at the Hollywood Bowl last summer. (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles…)

Country singing star Glen Campbell has listed a Mediterranean-style house in Malibu community for $3.395 million.

Built in 2010, the Tuscan-inspired estate features a five-bedroom main house, a detached guest house, an infinity-edge swimming pool with spa and a three-car garage. The grounds encompass more than five acres.

Campbell, 77, popularized such songs as "Galveston," "Wichita Lineman" and "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" and released more than 70 albums. The Grammy-winner announced two years ago that he has Alzheimer's disease.

He bought the property in December for $2.54 million, public records show.

Irene Dazzan-Palmer and Sandro Dazzan of Coldwell Banker's Malibu Colony office are the listing agents.

A 1,200-Square-Foot Malibu Bungalow Sells for $5.21 Million

Actress Natasha Gregson Wagner, daughter of actress Natalie Wood, has sold a 1,200-square-foot bungalow in Malibu, Calif., for $5.21 million.

The beachfront home, which sits in a quiet and coveted section called Malibu Road, has two bedrooms and two bathrooms. The kitchen, dining area and living room are one space, with sliding glass doors that open onto a deck overlooking the beach.

Ms. Gregson Wagner purchased the home in 1996 for $1.2 million, according to public records. According to her broker Richard Ehrlich, she did extensive remodeling on it. He says the home was never officially listed; it was quietly marketed to specific brokers via email.

Ms. Gregson Wagner and her partner, Barry Watson, decided to sell the house because it no longer accommodated their growing family, according to Mr. Ehrlich. The couple recently had a daughter, and Mr. Watson has two children from a prior relationship.

Mr. Ehrlich, vice president of Westside Estate Agency, represented Ms. Gregson Wagner in the sale. Irene Dazzan-Palmer and Sandro Dazzan of Coldwell Banker represented the buyer, who is in the restaurant business in Los Angeles and Las Vegas.

—L.S.B.

Fred Sands buys in Malibu for $14.7 million

January 31, 2013|By Lauren Beale

Businessman Fred Sands has purchased a beach house in Malibu for $14.7 million. (Realtor.com )

Real estate businessman Fred Sands has purchased a newly built beach home in Malibu for close to its asking price of $14.7 million.

The sellers are Tom Mendoza, vice chairman of NetApp, and his wife, Kathy, who has served as sales director and an operations director at the data management firm.

Kathy Mendoza spent three years working on the house, bringing in roof tiles from an Italian convent and importing the teak windows from Italy. Her current project is a castle restoration in Crete.

The contemporary Mediterranean features a courtyard entry, limestone and white oak floors, a floating-style staircase, five bedrooms, 5.5 bathrooms and 6,300 square feet of living space.

Sands sold the independent brokerage that bore his name in 2000 to Coldwell Banker. He heads Vintage Capital Group and Vintage Real Estate, which acquires and reinvents troubled malls. His main residence is in Bel-Air.

The Mendozas paid $8.303 million for the Malibu property in 2004, public records show.

Irene Dazzan-Palmer and Sandro Dazzan were the listing agents. Marcus Beck of Prudential California Realty's Malibu office represented Sands.

Rosenthal Malibu Wine Estate For Sale At $59.5 Million (PHOTOS)

The Huffington Post |  ByAnn Brenoff

Posted:07/20/2012 2:24 pm EDTUpdated:07/24/2012 12:47 pm EDT

Hollywood's answer to the Loire Valley is now for sale in Los Angeles. The Rosenthal Malibu Wine Estate has come on the market for the first time at $59.5 million. The estate includes a 12,000-square-foot main residence and 235 acres -- 25 of them with vines growing the grapes for cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay, cabernet franc, merlot, petit verdot, muscat and viognier.

Just like any good winery property should, this one screams Old World charm. High-end handcrafted details and indigenous materials are found throughout the historic hacienda-style home. The property has two guesthouses and features a tasting room (converted from an equestrian facility that once housed prize-winning Andalusian horses), a banquet room, cold storage room and office.

The estate was created by George Rosenthal, the founder of Raleigh Studios, the largest independent studio operator in the nation. He plans on focusing his attention on designing a yacht. We are sure it will have a great wine cellar.

The Malibu wine estate is situated 1,400 feet above the coastal fog. The entry is through impressive wooden gates that open to sweeping hillsides and old oak trees. The main residence features a sunny loggia and an outdoor terrace with a swimming pool, lap pool and dining area with fireplace, all overlooking the vineyards.

The living room features exposed-beam ceilings, an imported salmon-stone fireplace, hand-scraped bleached-oak floors and hand-painted frescos. The master suite has another salmon-stone fireplace, and lavish his-and-hers baths accented with Mexican onyx (his) and rosa marble (hers). There are hand-painted terra-cotta tiles in the gourmet kitchen.

Coldwell Banker agents Irene Dazzan Palmer and Sandro Dazzan share the listing.

2011 Forbes 30 Under 30 Includes Two Coldwell Banker Agents

On December 19, 2011 Forbes announced 30 people under 30 years old, in twelve varying industries who are making a difference right now in their respective fields. They are the innovative young minds shaping the future of business in the world. Two Coldwell Banker agents, Danny Hertzberg (@DannyHertzberg), Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate, Miami  and […]

LINDSAY LISTANSKIJAN 4, 2012

On December 19, 2011 Forbes announced 30 people under 30 years old, in twelve varying industries who are making a difference right now in their respective fields. They are the innovative young minds shaping the future of business in the world. Two Coldwell Banker agents, Danny Hertzberg (@DannyHertzberg), Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate, Miami  and Sandro Dazzan (@SandroD), Coldwell Banker Previews International, Malibu were selected as part of the 2011 Forbes 30 under 30.

With an average age of clientele ranging between 30-35, these young superstar agents equip young buyers and sellers with the tools, knowledge and resources they need to have success in their market.

Danny and Sandro offer their advice for what young people need to do when preparing to buy a house.

1) The first thing young buyers should do, even before touring prospective homes, is identify a comfortable price point. Younger buyers can get advice and direction from mortgage brokers who can assist them with getting pre approved.  Understanding the full payment is crucial. Buyers should have a clear idea of all payments including taxes and bills, once they complete these steps they can be prepared to write an offer when they find the right place.

2) Another important factor that young buyers should consider is getting to know the community.  Unlike renting and moving, buying a home is much more permanent which means the consequences are higher. Buyers should walk around the neighborhood on a weekend or at night after work, even talk to a neighbor to get comfortable with the setting of their potential home. The focus needs to go beyond just a “perfect home.”

3) Be open to family assistance. In this economy young buyers are often faced with strict requirements and feel that accepting help means giving up independence. In some cases they may be required to put down a down payment of 20-30%. Even if they are able to make this payment, they may not meet the credit requirements.  Family assistance has become a much more common trend. Whether it is accepting money for a down payment or living home with parents to save money, it is important to be open to help.

4) Choose a Realtor you are comfortable with and trust. Finding and purchasing a first home is one of the most important decisions you will make.  You will experience negotiations, laws and contracts that can seem overwhelming but with the right agent you will have the tools and resources you need to make the right decision.

Forbes:30 Under 30: Real Estate

Sandro Dazzan, Realtor, Coldwell Banker Previews International, 29

In past 3 years closed $100 million in home sales including Malibu's 2011 highest.

Buyer jumps at Flea's newly built Malibu home

The Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist sells his Malibu house for $3.15 million.

November 06, 2011|By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times

Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea, whose given name is Michael Balzary, has sold his newly built Malibu house for $3.15 million. The two-story contemporary had come on the market in June at $4,795,000.

Designed by Marmol Radziner, the indoor-outdoor home sits on 1.36 acres with a free-form pool and an outdoor fireplace. There are three bedrooms, three bathrooms and an office in more than 3,000 square feet.

Flea bought the previous house on the site in 2002 for $2.55 million, but it burned in the 2007 Malibu fires, according to The Times' archives.

The musician owns another house in Malibu that was purchased in 2006 for $9.98 million

Flea, 49, is a founding member of the Grammy-winning band, whose 10th album, "I'm With You," was released this summer.

Sandro Dazzan and Irene Dazzan-Palmer of Coldwell Banker's Malibu Colony office were the listing agents. Jill Reeder of Levin Group represented the buyer.

Hot Property: Cheech Marin puts a home in Malibu up for sale

He is asking $5.995 million for the 1929 Craftsman-style home.

June 03, 2011|By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times

Comic and actor Cheech Marin has listed a home in Malibu at $5,995,000.

The 1929 Craftsman-style house sits on nearly an acre on a low bluff above 120 feet of beach frontage. The three-bedroom main house includes a master suite with stained-glass windows. A three-bedroom guesthouse has a gym and a detached music room.

Since he partnered with Tommy Chong in the '70s and '80s counterculture comedy duo Cheech & Chong, the 64-year-old Marin has starred on "Nash Bridges" (1996-2001) and was a regular on "Judging Amy" (2004-05).

The listing agents are Irene Dazzan-Palmer and Sandro Dazzan of Coldwell Banker, Malibu Colony.

lauren.beale@latimes.com

September 23, 2017

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